10 Month Old Milestone

10 Month Old Developmental Milestones

At the 10 month milestone mark, your baby's pincer grasp is pincing. What does that mean?

Your Baby is Now 10 Months Old? What’s Happening?

At the 10 month milestone mark, you might be wondering how you’ve made it this far! But congrats! Because come hell or high (bath) water, you’ve done it.

10 MONTH MILESTONES!

  • Mastering pincer grasp
  • Developing object control
  • Messy eating is really messy, but an important step in development
  • Interested in toys but having a difficult time grabbing them
  • Standing and stacking (and kicking it over!)
  • Busting into squats from a standing position
  • May move to only one nap per day

Your Baby’s Brain at 10 Months

At this stage, your babe is learning to control objects between their thumb and index finger (aka the pincer grasp). As their fine motor skills develop, your baby will enjoy playing with their food, which makes it a great time to introduce more finger foods. They’ll also find fun in poking objects and putting objects in containers. You’ll notice that your child can release objects into your hand upon coaxing, which is a pretty neat trick and will come in handy when they start grabbing at your hair.

Protein at the ten month milestone mark is pulling double shifts. It helps build muscles and the cells and structures of the brain.

Did you know: You may be familiar with folate from your prenatal vitamins, but folate plays a critical role for your future foodie. Folate also known as vitamin B9, helps support infant’s rapidly growing cells as well as overall blood health and brain.


Your Baby’s Tummy at 10 Months

Your baby’s tummy is like a tiny tank, so we aim to use the space efficiently. By pairing nutrients together, we ensure maximum absorption. At the 10 month milestone you’ve likely introduced finger foods and are engaging in some self-feeding, as they fine tune their pincer grasp. Expect plenty of food under-foot and a messy high chair.

Messy eating is an important step in development, and should excite you that you’re on the right (albeit filthy) track. Might be time to invest in a family dog to scarf up all the food scraps.


Your Baby’s Eyes at 10 Months

At 10 months your baby can move their eyes diagonally. Those “shifty” eyes are looking at toys with a different level of fondness than before. At this age your baby will form preferences for certain objects and play with them in more complex ways than less-preferred toys. Additionally, as they grow into their personality, it will prove tempting to reach for a screen (saver) during fussier moments. Don’t cave! Lo-tech is still best for development and communication skills. Screens should be avoided until at least 18 months.

Did you know: Setting boundaries is an important part of parenting. At 10 months your baby begins to understand that they can do things that make you frown. They might love this negative attention. Don’t let them delight in this! Learn more about Boundary Setting and Your Baby.


Your Baby’s Muscles at 10 Months

A study at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology found that as babies become more mobile and acquire new skills, their brain activity significantly rises. This is true at the ten month milestone mark. The development of cognition, sensory and motor skills happen in tandem, so stimulating the whole body physically helps baby develop cognitively, as well. Hugging also helps. Studies have shown that the DNA of infants with less physical contact showed signs of underdevelopment years later.

And with their new 10 month milestone muscles, they can hug you back.

But if also means they can kick. Kicking or hitting toys announces grabbing. Your baby is interested in the toy but isn’t sure how to get it yet. Baby gyms at this phase are great since they can feel a sense of accomplishment through kicking.

Gross Motor vs. Fine Motor Skills 

Motor skills are an area that are easy to fixate on, especially at the 10 month milestone mark when your baby is really grabbing at stuff around the house. Fine motor skills refer to the smaller muscles of the arms and hand and involve manipulating objects. Gross motor skills on the other hand begin with baby mastering control of the head and then progress to rolling, sitting, crawling, standing and walking. Often parents fixate on gross motor skills because they seem like an obvious indicator of neurological development, however, every child develops at their own pace. 

As these fine motor skills develop, your baby will enjoy playing with their food, which, again, makes it a great time to introduce more finger foods (and a great time to buy more eco-friendly paper towels). 

Learn more about Yumi’s Bites and Puffs menu here. 


Your Baby’s Senses at 10 Months

Baby’s first Rubik’s Cube 

Physical challenges at this age may help your baby’s entire brain develop. A study at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, found that as babies become more mobile and acquire new skills, their brain activity significantly rises. The development of cognition, sensory and motor skills happen in tandem, so stimulating the whole body physically helps baby develop cognitively, as well.

So get out there, take your babe on a walk, play games with them, and read them books. Roll in the grass together and help them explore their environment, physically and through their senses.


Food for Thought

Squeeze pouches offer a convenient blend of healthy produce, often using organic options, in a mess-free form that many parents feel is a nutritious choice. However, some health professionals are cautioning against regular feeding of squeeze pouches, suggesting that reliance on pouches can delay developmental skills, interfere with normal feeding skills, and result in picky eaters later on. Additionally, the packaging doesn’t allow children to use their senses of sight, smell, and touch during feeding. Food offers babies the chance to explore colors, textures, and shapes – all important factors in normal sensory development. Save squeeze pouches for times when you’re on the go or traveling.

Learn more about why we say: Squeeze Cheeks, Not Pouches. 


 

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